Research news

Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

Publish Date: 03.12.2018

Category: Outstanding research achievements, Interdisciplinary research, Our contribution to sustainable development goals

Sustainable development goals: 4 Quality education (Indicators)

Listening to the text while reading more demanding English texts undoubtedly helps Slovene 6th grade students with dyslexia, while students without dyslexia do not need it.

Authors: Milena Košak Babuder, Karmen Pižorn

Listening to the text while reading it is a differential stimulus for pupils with dyslexia and can therefore be offered as a special adjustment in certain assessment and educational contexts—e.g. in reading and listening more demanding texts. After five years of literacy-oriented teaching, students with dyslexia still lag behind their peers in decoding, so it is important in early learning of English as a deep language to detect forms of dyslexia that are more difficult to detect with instruments utilised in Slovene as a transparent language.

Two studies were carried out, in which researchers (Milena Košak Babuder and Karmen Pižorn from the Faculty of Education at the University of Ljubljana and Judith Kormos and Michael Ratajczak from the University of Lancaster) wanted to find out how different text inputs ((1) reading, (2) reading with simultaneous listening, and (3) listening) influence the understanding of English texts of varying difficulty among Grade 6 students with and without dyslexia. The first study found that the understanding of texts in pupils who attend Grade 6 is influenced by the modal input and the complexity of the text. The second study determined the differences between low-level skills in the Slovene language and reading, reading with simultaneous listening and listening in English among Grade 6 pupils with or without dyslexia. Both studies were carried out on the same sample of 233 non-dyslexic and 47 dyslexic students. Texts of different complexity were used to measure reading comprehension. The data were processed with complex statistical methods, which proved the validity and repeatability of the study.

References: Kormos J., Košak Babuder M., Pižorn K. The role of low-level first language skills in second language reading, reading-while-listening and listening performance: a study of young dyslexic and non-dyslexic language learners, Appl. Linguist., (2018), doi: 10.1093/applin/amy028.

Košak Babuder M., Kormos J., Ratajczak M., Pižorn K. The effect of read-aloud assistance on the text comprehension of dyslexic and non-dyslexic English language learners. Lang. Test., (2018), doi:10.1177/0265532218756946. 

 Disleksija

Connection between low-level skills in the first language and results of a reading comprehension test in English (J2) with three different input modes (reading, listening and simultaneous reading by listening) (N = 276) 

Image source: Kormos J., Košak Babuder M., Pižorn K. The role of low-level first language skills in second language reading, reading-while-listening and listening performance: a study of young dyslexic and non-dyslexic language learners, Appl. Linguist., (2018), doi: 10.1093/applin/amy028

back to list